Tag Archives: marathon training

Introducing Tuesdays With Tina!

18 Mar

Some of you who have been following me for awhile know that I run every race with my mom (maybe with the exception of 1 or 2 in the past few years).

I wanted to tell you our story, but also introduce my mom because she will be contributing some posts from time to time. Hence this post’s name! It won’t be every Tuesday, but check back on Tuesdays to see if she has written something 😉

Our Story

When I was a senior in college, I decided to start getting active and eating healthier. I gained about 10 lbs. from junior-senior year, mainly because I was eating out a lot more, and taking advantage of the buffet style eating in the dining halls.

My mom and I decided to start doing Jillian Michaels’ 30 Day Shred, and would call each other to check in and talk about our progress.

In April of 2010, we decided to run our first 5K! I had ran cross country in high school, but this was my first organized race since that time (2006). It was my first public road race too. You can tell how much of noobs we were by this picture:

We got to the start line like, 20 minutes early because we wanted to be the first ones there. Little did we know, only the fast people go in the front! 😛

Isn’t it funny how you can look back at early race pictures and tell you were new to it based on your clothing and gear? We were wearing the race shirt, and I don’t even know what shorts and sneakers I was wearing.

We finished in around 29 minutes. After that, we started running more and more races. At this point, the thought of running a half-marathon or marathon had not even crossed our minds.

Remember Soffe shorts?

Around this time was when we got my dad more into active living too. He started running a couple races with us as well.

Then I told my mom we should run a half-marathon, and she thought I was crazy. Eventually I convinced her though, and the Long Branch Half Marathon was our first!

long branch half marathon

After that…I told my mom we should run a marathon. Then she really thought I was crazy. But I somehow convinced her to do that too. We decided to fundraise for the Christoper Reeve Foundation, and entered the New York City Marathon. Here’s my recap of our first NYC Marathon…we both couldn’t believe we did it!

nyc marathon 2011

There were a couple half-marathons in between as well. But yeah, 2011 was the year we truly fell in love with running. This past year, we ran the New York City Marathon again (<-recap), and using Hansons Marathon Method, PRed by 33 minutes! Here’s our video recap if you like those…I like to think it captures both us running, but the amazing spectators and spirit of the marathon!

What’s Next?

Currently, we haven’t really been running or training for anything. But we gotta get our butt in gear because we want to do the NYRR 9+1 program to get in for the 2015 NYC Marathon! We also have a half-marathon in July while we are away in Paraguay. I’d also like to break my 5K PR.

So what was the point of this post? I wanted to share with you all how special running is for me and my mom. We have gone through it all with running, and it’s amazing to have someone to motivate you, as well as someone to listen to you talk about running all the time 😉

I also wanted to introduce you guys to my mom. She has played an instrumental role in my fitness life, and I know she will have some great things to share with you as well.

So without further ado…say hello to my mom! Please leave a comment with any questions that you may have for her! She’s a mom, runner, lifter…she may be able to provide some insight and experience that I cant. The next post will be her words and not mine!

Do you exercise with loved ones?

If you’re a runner, when was your first race?

Did you ever wear soffe shorts? 😛

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Are You “Crazy?”

21 Jan

How many times has someone said to you:

  • “You’re running how much? You’re crazy!”
  • “You’re not going out Friday because you have to get up to workout on Saturday? You’re crazy!”
  • “You really aren’t going to eat that because you’re eating healthy? You’re crazy OR Yeah, I can’t do that.”

Since when is living a healthy lifestyle something that is “crazy” or something we may get a hard time about?

This happened a few times to me during marathon training. I wouldn’t be able to go out the day before a long run (weekends), so people would always say, “you never come out anymore!” or “This is why I’d never train for a marathon-it takes over your life.”

But it’s a choice. It was my choice and one I really enjoyed doing. Why should we be made to feel bad about our choices?

Same thing goes for healthy eating. I’ve been in situations where I won’t eat something because I try to stay away from processed foods. Now, that doesn’t mean I don’t splurge or treat myself sometimes. But if I say I don’t want a huge deli sandwich, or don’t want that slice of pizza, why should I feel bad?

Friends have told me they experience this mainly in a work setting, where bringing in snacks for everyone or office parties are the norm. People will say, “come onnnn just have one-it won’t kill you!” Or they call you crazy (or any other number of derivatives) for eating so healthy.

People have called me obsessed, and some close friends don’t understand why I can’t just skip runs or gym days.

It’s hard to understand people these days. On one hand, we want to reduce obesity, and encourage others to live an active healthy lifestyle, but on the other hand, we call people who DO live an active lifestyle crazy or say they’re too obsessed with health and fitness. Why is that?

I’ll leave you with this quote that I love:

difference between interest and commitment

What do you think of all of this?

Has anyone ever called you crazy or criticized you for any of this? How did you respond?

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Training With Marc: “Training For a Marathon”

19 Dec

This is a series I started with my old running coach, called Training With Marc. Marc Pelerin is a running coach, and runs TrainWithMarc.com. He provides runners with personalized plans to help them achieve their goals. Oh and he was also an awesome runner in high school and in college…so he’s got a lot of experience! Visit his website for more info on the coaching he provides. I worked with him for over 2 years and was very happy with the results!

Hi everyone!  It’s Coach Marc and I’m back. This time I’m writing about what it takes to run a marathon.  We all know that 26.2 miles is no joke.  So what’s the best way to prepare?  Here’s my run-down for you:

1.  Be prepared to put in some serious work.  A marathon isn’t the same as a 5k – you can’t just go out and “do” one.  You’ve got to put in months (and sometimes years) of serious training.

2.  Remind yourself you’ll have to sacrifice a bit.  There are times you’ll want to go out and have drinks instead of get up for your long run.  Remember 26.2 miles is far.  Be prepared for early nights and early mornings!

3.  Visit your local running shop and ask questions.  Whenever I need a bit of motivation, I pop over to the Haddonfield Running Company.  Find your local store and get the right shoes for your foot type.  Buy some new running clothes and a good watch to start your training.  Don’t forget to hydrate – carry a water bottle with you!  Find out what other runners do and formulate a plan.

4.  Find a running coach who can create a plan to help you reach your 26.2 goal.  Not all coaches are created equal.  Find someone who you trust and who has experience working with runners of all abilities.

5.  Track the progress you make.  Create a blog or online training log so that other people can help keep you motivated and provide that extra support you might need.

6.  Plan ahead so you can still have your fun.  Planning allows you to still have a life while still getting in all of the important runs.

What other advice would you add?  How much weekly mileage do you think is necessary to complete a marathon?

Looking to get into running or need to take your running to the next level?  Send me a message @ TrainWithMarc, on  Facebook or on Twitter.  To get started with a plan of your own, visit TrainWithMarc.com.

Find more Training With Marc posts here.

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Hansons Marathon Method Review

12 Nov

As many of you may know, I used the Hansons Marathon Method as my training plan leading up to the ING New York City Marathon. I was really apprehensive about using this training plan, but really wanted to have a good race this year, as opposed to 2011.

I honestly don’t even remember where I found out about this training plan, but once I read reviews about it online, I immediately bought the book through Kindle.

After reading it, I was seriously so nervous about training. It would be way more than I have ever ran…but I knew that would help me get faster and fitter as well. The book comes with a “Beginner” plan and an “Advanced” plan…though even with the beginner plan, you should probably have a good base before starting it.

Cumulative Fatigue

One of the main principles of Hansons Marathon Method is cumulative fatigue. Cumulative fatigue is, “the accumulation of fatigue over days, weeks, and even months of consistent training.” It doesn’t allow for full recovery between hard runs, though that doesn’t mean you wont’ have recovery days…more on that later.

The Hansons have 5 components that will result in this cumulative fatigue:

  1. Mileage
  2. Intensity
  3. Balance
  4. Consistency
  5. Recovery

Mileage

The difference with this plan and many others is that the bulk of your weekly mileage will not be on the weekends. They say many plans have you running only 3-4x per week, and then running your long run on the weekends. That means 50% of your weekly mileage is done within the span of 2 days. That can lead to overtraining and injury. You will be running 6 days a week. They state that this could freak some runners out in the beginning…I didn’t think I could do it, or run around 50 miles per week like they asked me too…but as they say, have confidence, and you will slowly build up to it. The great thing is that in the first few weeks, you get 2 rest days per week.

Intensity

This plan includes tempo runs, track workouts, and your usual long run. But most of your days will be easy run. While many runners think easy runs are junk miles with no real benefit, according to the Hansons, they are the runs that will really help you in the marathon. Why? Because you are running on tired legs. Do you know how many days after a tempo or track workout I really did NOT want to go out for an easy 5-6 miles? But I did because I knew running on tired legs would help me succeed in the marathon. Also, they stress that in those tempo and track workouts, proper pacing is KEY. If you go out faster than you are told, your body will take even longer to recover from a hard workout.

Balance

As I mentioned above, this training plan emphasize balance in all runs. Your long run shouldn’t be the bulk of your weekly mileage. Instead, all of your SOS (Something of Substance) workouts should be equally as important. Which is why during the week you could be running anywhere from 8-12 miles in your SOS workouts. That also helped me not be so nervous before long runs, because I was already running a decent amount during the week! The good thing about it too is if you must miss a run, all of the workouts are balanced and equal, so missing 1 long run will not totally ruin your entire plan. BUT, you really should try not to miss runs because it will throw your training off and put you behind. I think I only missed about 2-3 runs before I got injured (and had to miss a whole week).

Recovery

“When it comes to cumulative fatigue, you walk a thin line between training enough and overtraining.” Incomplete recovery allows you to perform well, even when you’re not feeling 100%. SOS runs are followed by easy runs. You will not go into a long run with fresh legs…because what’s the point? At mile 20 of the marathon, you won’t have fresh legs. The Hansons want you to get used to that feeling. The good thing about their recovery is that you can run 1-2 minutes slower per mile than your goal pace. It should truly be an easy pace. Enjoy these runs as leisurely runs where you don’t have to worry about time.

Other Key Points

If you look up Hansons Marathon Method, you will find the first thing you read about it is that you will not run 20 miles in training before the marathon. What?!?! Yup.

Not gonna lie…it’s awesome. I loved it. I did not feel like running 20 miles in training before the race. It takes up so much time, and they argue that it also requires a lot of recovery time too.

They are not saying, however, that everyone should not run 20 miles in training. Their rule of thumb is that your long run shouldn’t be 50% of your weekly mileage and that a long run shouldn’t take longer than about 3 hours to complete. After 3 hours, you’re hurting yourself more than benefiting yourself. Your body will need a lot more recovery time, which may lead to missing a run because you’re not feeling recovered.

I actually ran 18 miles in training, as opposed to 16, because I would finish right around 3 hours. If you need longer mileage for mental confidence, then go for the 18. Generally speaking, this plan has you running one 15 miler, and 3 16 milers before the race. And a bunch of double digit weekday runs.

What I Liked:

  • Very structured…took the guess work out of my training plan. Everything you do is explained by science and facts, which makes you feel more confident.
  • Tempo runs (though I also didn’t like them at times haha). They really help build your confidence since you are running at goal pace.
  • Not having to run 20 miles. Maybe once my average pace is faster, I will run longer…I hope one day I can run 20 miles in around 3 hours but that is a long time away!

What I didn’t like:

  • Honestly, there isn’t much I didn’t like. Running 6 days a week is tough. But you’re training for a marathon, it’s going to be tough.
  • Some days, getting in those easy, recovery runs is harder than the SOS workouts. 1) Running 5-6 miles after a hard workout is hard. Your legs feel like logs. 2) Running 8 miles before a long run the next day can be intimidating, but you know it will definitely help you in the marathon.
  • That’s really it!

Overall, I would highly suggest this plan to someone looking for one before their next marathon. It makes sense, has good information, and outlines everything you need to know, along with paces for each workout. They also include nutrition tips, taper tips, strength workouts, and more.

I ran NYCM and got a 33 min. PR! I really attribute this to the plan. Honestly, I never hit “the wall.” My energy never waned. Yes, my hips got tight around mile 24…but I ran 24 miles with ZERO problems, and was able to finish a marathon with only 1 walk break to stretch. It felt amazing to be passing people at the end, instead of being passed.

As I was finishing the race, this Hansons phrase stuck out to me, “We are training you for the last 16 miles of the race, not the first 16.” The cumulative fatigue aspect of this plan is what really helped me.

Would I use it again? Definitely! I already am trying to figure out a way to modify the plan in order to use it for half marathon training. If I run a marathon again next year, I will stick to the beginner plan again, since I couldn’t complete all the runs towards the end. If I can stay healthy, I wonder if I can get another huge PR!

Have you used Hansons Marathon Method?

Would you consider it?

If you use it, please let me know, I’d love to hear your thoughts, and I’m open to any questions you may have!

Here’s a basic outline of their Advanced plan, taken from their website.

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Best Race Ever – 2013 ING New York City Marathon Recap

7 Nov

Ok, this may get long…so bear with me 🙂

The 2013 ING New York City Marathon was amazing. I don’t know how words can do it justice but I will try to describe my day!

First, I want to thank everyone who wished my mom and me well, commented or tweeted with advice and support, and to those who were at the race as spectators, especially my family and friends. We couldn’t have done it without your support, especially me since I was freaking out about my whole shin problem…

So where to begin…

We woke up at 6 am because luckily we didn’t have to get on a ferry until 8:30 am (though this actually would turn out to not be so lucky).  I was so nervous. I was nervous about not having run over 5 miles in the last 2 weeks, I was nervous about the wind…I was really scared it wouldn’t be my day. But having a bright, fun outfit did make me feel better 😉

marathon outfitWe got ready and drove into the city. We waited for the 8:30 Staten Island Ferry, though in hindsight, we should have just gotten on the 8:15 one that was there right when we walked in. I didn’t know they wouldn’t be checking your bib to see your boarding time.

Anyway, we got on the ferry around 8:40, and I attempted to eat my breakfast. I had a piece of toast and 1 egg before leaving the house, then had oatmeal with PB, honey and a banana/1 more egg on the ferry. I was so nervous it was honestly hard for me to get this down!

Once we got off, it was a long wait to get on the buses to the start village.  It took probably 30 minutes to get on a bus, at which point we had to stand because there were no seats. Now I was worried about my feet/shins from standing so long. The bus ride took an additional 30 minutes. This was probably the most annoying part of the day.

on the bus

on the bus

We finally got to the starting area at 10, and needed to be in our corrals by 10:40. We sat down in the starting area and started putting on socks, numbers, taking our jackets/sweats off etc. and the next thing I know it is 10:30!!! We had 10 minutes to get our bags to the UPS trucks and go to the bathroom, then run to our corral. Now I was really cursing myself for not signing up for the 8 am ferry…why did the man at the expo say we’d have plenty of time?!

The UPS truck literally started pulling away and saw my mom running after him so he took our bags. We ran to the porta-potty, then started running to our corral. We looked behind us and we were actually the last runners going in lol. Oops!

Whatever, once we got there it was fine. We relaxed and made the walk to the base of the Verrazano Bridge. We actually got there when they were singing the national anthem, and were quickly trying to set our watches, put phones away, make our fuel belts comfortable etc, last minute. Then the cannon went off! I had to pull to the side before crossing the starting mat because I was having issues with my Garmin…but after a few seconds we were finally off!!!

startline

Miles 1-2: Like they always say, you really don’t feel the incline of the Verrazano Bridge. It’s a mile uphill but you’re too busy feeling excited! Mile 2 is all downhill so you have to make sure to rein yourself in. Once you get to the other side, you start hearing the crowds and bands and know that your journey is about to begin.

Miles 3-6: Last time I ran, I wasn’t a big fan of the Brooklyn portion of the race, because it seems never ending (you run about 13 miles in Brooklyn), but this year I loved it! As soon as we got off the bridge, there was a marching band playing and people screaming your name. Mile 3-6 few by and we were averaging about a 10:30 pace. I got my first comment about the back of my shirt 🙂 A girl came up to me and said, “We’re following the leader!”

Miles 7-10: Seriously, the crowd support in Brooklyn was phenomenal. It felt like everyone was screaming out “PATTY!! TINA!!” to us and we loved it. I high-fived people, waved and fist pumped…it was great. Our pace had dropped to 10:35 but I was okay with it. I wanted to say in the easy zone until after mile 15. We met up with my family and Dan around mile 7.5. Dan surprised me with a sign that said, “Run Like This Wind.” 🙂 We took a quick pic and then continued on our way.

Waiting for us to arrive

Waiting for us to arrive

Miles 11-13: There was a good thing and bad thing about being around mile 10. The good thing was, we ran this portion of the course twice in practice (mile 10-finish), so we were finally in familiar territory on Bedford Ave. The bad thing was it was pretty narrow and we were so crowded at one point I was forced to stop and walk to try to get around runners! I know there were 50K runners this year but this was not fun. I was glad once we got closer to the Pulaski Bridge because it opened up. The Pulaski Bridge is at mile 13, and I remember this being challenging in 2011, but this year we cruised right on over it. I was so happy to be in Queens!

Miles 14-15: I don’t remember much of running through Queens because I was mentally preparing myself for the Queensboro Bridge. Around mile 14.5, we saw my family and Dan again, yay! Though this threw me off here…my dad was supposed to hand off some GUs to me, but I forgot! So I waved, kept running, then remembered and sprinted back to grab them. Thankfully my mom remembered, but I think this is where my pace got all wacky, because once we got onto the bridge, my breathing and rhythm were off. The bridge wasn’t bad at all, and once again I was happy we had practiced it in training. We were still feeling strong!

Miles 16-20: People talk about the crowds on First Ave. but I definitely prefer Brooklyn. The road here is really wide so it doesn’t feel as if you’re running through a tunnel of people like on Fourth Ave. But don’t get me wrong, there are still a ton of people. We were feeling good though our pace had dropped to around 10:45 after the bridge. Around mile 18 I told my mom we could probably pick it up a bit. I was just looking at the street signs, counting them down (or up?) until we could get to 126th and cross into the Bronx. I got another comment here about the back of my shirt -this woman came up to me and said, we are following you because you’re such a nice girl! Then wished me luck…put a smile on my face.

Mile 20-22: We crossed into the Bronx and finally got to mile 20! I vividly remembered in 2011 how much I was struggling here. It felt so good to be feeling strong and going steady. I asked my mom how she felt, and she was fine too, so we tried to speed up a tiny bit, and even though it felt like we did, according to splits, we actually stayed the same haha. After mile 22 we saw my family and Dan again! I told my mom I couldn’t stop for a pic or anything because if I did it would be too hard to start again. We just waved and gave them a thumbs up.

nyc marathon mile 22

Mile 23: Uh oh…the pain has set in. Here, my hip flexors started feeling really weak. It was such a weird feeling. It was weak, or tight, I don’t know but I felt like if I ran faster, my legs would give out. I slowed down to what felt like a crawl, but according to the splits, it was only a 10:59 pace at this point. I felt guilty for holding my mom back yet again, because she was totally fine, just like in 2011, but she stuck with me.

I think this is where the hill on 5th Ave starts? It’s almost a mile uphill, and in practice I remember thinking, OMG this hill will be killer on race day! Actually, I was so thankful for the hill. I wanted a hill at this point because I figured it would take pressure off my hip flexors and allow me to use different muscles. It kinda did…

Mile 24: We’re in Central Park! This is the one and only place we stopped the whole race! I stopped to stretch my hips for 30 seconds then we continued…albeit slow. I started to play a game where I’d speed up from light pole to light pole and slow down in between. Right before miles 25, I pulled over to stretch real quick again and spectators started chanting PATTY! PATTY! PATTY! Once I got up to run, they cheered so loud and a woman put some grapes in my hand. I smiled and went on my way. PS-why is it taking so long to get to mile 25 at this point?!

Mile 25: Ok, the last mile. I CAN DO THIS. I told my mom, Let’s go, and we sped up. I kept repeating to myself, “Ignore the pain. Pain is temporary. You want to finish by 4:50.” I knew 4:45 was out of reach but I really wanted 4:50. I looked at my Garmin and it said we were going around 10:45/mile (as opposed to the almost 11:30 I was doing at mile 24).

We ran up Central Park South which seemed neverending, but I knew my family and Dan were waiting at Columbus Circle to see us one last time. We were actually passing a bunch of people here which felt great! In 2011, I was walking this part, I was dead. This time I still had all the energy in the world and was waving to people who were screaming my name. We saw my family and I gave them the thumbs up and a big smile, and kept running.

nyc marathon mile 25

Mile 26 (!!!!!!): We saw the sign and it felt surreal. My mom was like we finally made it! I said ok let’s pretend this is a track workout and speed it up! We went as fast as we could (after 26 miles), and were all smiles. Someone yelled, only 400 yards to go, you got this!!! We threw our hands up in the air and crossed the finish line: 4:50:49. A 33 minute PR!!!

nyc marathon finishWe hugged and were so happy. I was cherishing this moment, because the last time I crossed this finish line, I immediately ran to a bush and threw up, and then ended up in the medical tent. Seriously, this race was a far cry from 2011…look at this picture that says it all…

393432_10101039871201659_481230406_n

Now, I honestly felt like we had just done a long training run. My energy levels never waned. Our fueling was spot on…and I’m glad I discovered S!Caps which helped regulate my electrolytes and salt…especially since my face was covered in dry salt at the end!

We picked up our medals and heat sheets, and started walking to the UPS trucks. I had to sit on the curb for a little to stretch because my legs got so stiff, I couldn’t bend my right knee. I also stopped and sat in the truck for a bit, though it was hard to get back up…

IMG_1334

We got out on West 88th, and my family was on West 63rd, so there was NO WAY I was walking that far. We hopped on the subway (well, slowly walked down the stairs with a bunch of other runners lol) and finally met up with them around 2 hours after finishing. This part of the race sucks too but it is what is is. I’ve read people say that they will never run NYC again because of the long march after the finish but come on people, there are 50K runners, NYRR does what they can!

We finally met up with my family, Dan and my best friend Nicole 🙂

DSC_0030

I couldn’t walk Sunday night (actually almost cried trying to go up the stairs, not gonna lie), or Monday…but I am finally back to normal now! My dad said, “Hey you did this to yourself,” and I would do it all over again!

Here are our splits, in case you’re curious. I’d say we stayed pretty steady the whole race until around mile 23-24 when my hips got all weird. I’m really proud of our pacing!

Screen shot 2013-11-03 at 10.31.25 PM

My Garmin was pretty spot on too…so glad I invested in one finally:

IMG_9514

Although our A goal was 4:30, we are so happy with our performance. I knew going in that 4:30 may not be feasible due to the time off I had to take because of my shin. Our B goal was 4:45, and our C goal was anything under 5…so we’re pretty happy!

It was truly an amazing day. We had a perfect race…PRed, and the spectators made us feel so special. I have been thinking about the whole day since Sunday, and replaying it in my head. I can’t believe it is over! I definitely have the post-marathon blues, but I’m already thinking about what spring races to do 🙂 I wish I could complete 9+1 for 2014 NYCM, but it’s too late. Oh well, we’ll be coming back in 2015, New York!

Did you run NYCM? Is it on your bucket list? What’s the best race that you have ever had?

Read my 2011 NYC Marathon Recap here.

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We did it!!!

4 Nov

IMG_1330

I’ll write up a recap soon but today = relaxing on the couch and being lazy since I can barely walk =)

It was a truly amazing day!!!!

Marathon Playlist + Last Minute Thoughts

2 Nov

TOMORROW IS THE DAY!

I can’t believe it is hear. I am beyond nervous…but I’ll get to that in a bit.

I wanted to share my marathon playlist with you all. It’s only a little over an hour but I only plan on listening to music around mile 18-20 and only if I’m really struggling which hopefully is NOT the case! It’s a mix of songs, and this past week I’d hear a song come on my iTunes and think, “I need to add that to my list!”

What are your go-to pump up songs? What would you add? I am open to suggestions!

currentplaylist10

Last Minute Thoughts:

I’m really nervous…here’s why BUT I’m going to try to add in some positive affirmations after each one:

  • I’m nervous because the past 3 weeks of training have not gone as planned. I’ve missed 8 days of training, and got sick this past week. Positive Affirmation: I need to trust the training I did for 16 weeks. I ran my long runs and ran in the double digits during week days as well…I have ran more than I have ever run in the past.
  • I’m nervous because I of course got a cold this week. Positive Affirmation: I feel much better now, and though my nose will probably be runny…energy wise I feel okay. Plus, I’ve read about some runners who got sick during taper week and then PRed!
  • I’m nervous of feeling out of shape due to not running as much, and out of breath. Positive Affirmation: I will go at an easy pace in the beginning. And as my friend told me, I can take walking breaks as needed.
  • I’m nervous of not being able to finish for some crazy reason. Positive Affirmation: I WILL finish. I finished 26.2 miles in 2011 on way less training and it was my first marathon. I have covered the distance before and can do it again.

I need to keep telling myself these things! I am trying to have faith in my body and legs. I’m also nervous about the crazy wind…35 mph gusts?!?! Awesome…but alas, you can only control your body and your training. I will try to draft off other runners, or take turns with my mom drafting.

Help! Do you have any positive affirmations or thoughts you use to build mental confidence? Please share them with me!!!

See you on the other side! 😉

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NYC Marathon Training Week 17

28 Oct

17 weeks in the books! Wow…cannot believe it…The last 3 weeks of this training plan have not gone as planned, however. I had to cross train all of last week, and this week I took it easy because of my shin…but at least I am back to running! It’s a lot less than my training plan called for but do you think that will make a huge difference?

Here’s last week’s info:

Monday:

Supposed to do 6×1 mile at 10 sec. faster than goal marathon pace.

Cross-trained instead.

Tuesday:

I think I was supposed to do 6-7 miles. It was my first day back to running in 8 days, so I eased into it with an easy 3 miles. Felt ok but definitely felt more “tired” while running than I usually do.

Wednesday:

Easy 4 miles…felt pretty good!

Thursday:

Needed to do 1 mile warm up, 10 miles at goal pace, 1 mile cooldown.

This was obviously not happening. I did half mile warm up, 6 miles at goal pace, half mile cooldown. Pace was ok…kind of slower than it needed to be (10:18) but it was hilly towards the end.

Friday:

Easy 4 miles. No pain…felt pretty good.

Saturday:

Off

Sunday:

Needed to do 6 but I was EXHAUSTED from not sleeping Friday night. Took off =( At least I got a full body massage though!

So now it’s taper time…I ran significantly fewer miles than my plan advised…do you think this will affect me?

My biggest fear right now is starting the race and feeling tired and heavy and out of breath by mile 3. You know those runs? I hope this doesn’t happen.

My sports chiro said my leg feels much looser, and the pain has gone away…but I’m still very nervous!!! I plan on hydrating this week, but also making sure I take care of my shin. Elite runner Jenny Simpson even offered me advice!

I had such a good training cycle up until Week 16…I keep trying to remember all of that but I can’t help but feel nervous and scared that I won’t finish.

Have you ever felt like this before a race? How do you banish negative thoughts? Help!!

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Motivational Monday!

28 Oct

October is over already…my friend and I were talking about New Year’s dresses the other day…where is time going??? I don’t want it to be 2014!

Anyway, last week, I found this quote on Instagram on a fellow runner’s account (@blonde_bun_runner). I totally could relate:

This can relate to anyone. How often do you get caught up with worrying and stressing out? We don’t even realize how much we worry sometimes. I saw this and immediately related it to my marathon training. I haven’t had the best last 3 weeks of running and I’m really nervous. Then I saw this and thought, I’m running a marathon. I have the ability to RUN, period. I have an able body, and 2 legs that will take me through 26.2 miles (hopefully). Time doesn’t matter. I should be thankful for the opportunity…because there are many people out there who wish they could walk or run. Something I need to remember whenever I start worrying this week…

What are you currently worrying about? How will you change your point of view on this and instead of thankful? Tell me in the comments!

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Thinking Out Loud: Fueling For Long Runs

24 Oct

I thought about writing this post after recently being asked, “You need this many GUs for a 16 mile run?!” by the local sneaker store employee. It made me feel kind of embarrassed for some reason. But yes, I need that many! I am not about to bonk in my next marathon again (hopefully).

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For that 16 miler, I took a GU every 3 miles. An intake of about 200 calories per hour. This is more than I see most people taking, as most take 1 every 45-60 minutes. And that’s what the instructions say too.

But I’m confused. Why do the instructions say take one every 45ish minutes, but other sources say if you’re doing a long run, or running a marathon, you should be taking in about 200 calories per hour (and 3-60g of carbs per hour)? Obviously this depends on your stomach and stuff, but why is there that discrepancy?

GU nutrition facts

This excerpt is from an article in Runner’s World, “How To Eat During Long Runs,”

In general, runners need to add in 30 to 60 grams of carbohydrate each hour that they are running longer than 75 minutes. But you’ll need to start fueling earlier than 75 minutes into a run; by that time, your tank will be empty, and once you hit empty it is very hard to recover. Start taking in fuel within 30 minutes of hitting the pavement.

This is from Active, “How To Fuel On A Run,”

To perform your best, you need between 30 and 60 grams of carbohydrate for each hour of exercise. Sports drinks like Hammer HEED, Powerade and Gatorade supply a blend of carbs, such as maltodextrin and glucose, plus water and sodium to prevent dehydration, says Nancy Clark, R.D., author of Nancy Clark’s Sports Nutrition Guidebook.

And from Mizuno,

Finally, during the marathon, you should fuel with about 200-350 calories per hour (after the first hour), as tolerated.

According to this fueling calculator, I should have a gel within the first hour, then every 4 miles after that. I somewhat adhere to this, as I  have a gel every 3ish miles.

And then there’s hydration…which I have only recently mastered…somewhat.

According to the BAA, “During training and racing, drink at regular 15 to 20 minute intervals to minimize loss of body weight to approximately 2% of your starting body weight by the end of the race.”

Now, I drink every 2-3 miles, but also when I get thirsty. On long runs, I have practices sipping on water as I run. I made a huge mistake in the last marathon, because I was only fueling and hydrating every 6 miles. Talk about a newb!

I’m hoping that my new way of fueling and hydrating will lead to a way better marathon…and not finishing dehydrated and puking…

For some people, fueling too much affects their stomach so they have to take less, but I think I have definitely benefited from learning how to fuel more often…especially because I sweat a TON.

What do you think about all of this fuel information? Do you try to get 30-60g of carbs, or 200 calories per hour in your races?

What’s your favorite way to fuel?

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